Humanities

Monday Missive – September 18, 2017

3 Under 30 — The website Charlotte Agenda recently ran an article titled “30 Under 30”  in which they featured thirty young people who are making a difference in the Charlotte community.  Inside UNC Charlotte picked up this story and noted that of the people featured in the article six graduated from UNC Charlotte, including one who majored in English.  For more information, please click on the following link:  http://inside.uncc.edu/news-features/2017-09-11/alums-make-%E2%80%9930-under-30%E2%80%99-list ...

Crucifixion: “That Most Wretched of Deaths” What Do We Know?

So the soldiers, out of the wrath and hatred they bore the Jews, nailed those they caught, one after one way, and another after another, to the crosses, by way of jest, when their multitude was so great, that room was wanting for the crosses, and crosses wanting for the bodies. (Jewish War 5:446-451) Joseph [...]...

The Story of Sodom and Gomorroah: Where, When, and Whether?

The story of the fiery destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah is one of a diminishing few biblical narratives of which our culture is familiar. Though few might have read the extended account, set in the time of Abraham, that runs through Genesis 18-19, the imagery has become proverbial. This was already the case in the [...]...

The New Covenant is NOT a Book!

Happily, I come out of a Christian tradition in which the Hebrew Bible carries as much authority as the New Testament. No different weight is given to one or the other. The Bible is one, Old and New, in my particular tradition. My own interest is far more in the Hebrew Bible. My religion is [...]...

Confederate Memorials: Celebrating Racism, Erasing History

By John Cox

August 29, 2017

“All those folks worried about erasing history when Confederate monuments come down will be thrilled to learn about the existence of books.” – Jamil Smith, August 16

 

“All black Americans are born into a society which is determined—repeat, determined—that they shall never know the truth about themselves or their society.” – James Baldwin, “Black Power,” 1968 (in Baldwin, The Cross of Redemption: Uncollected Essays...

What is Going to Happen on September 23, 2017–A Prediction of My Own!

  I am teaching a course this semester called “The End of the World as We Know It” after the REM song of that name. We are examining ideas associated with Biblical prophecy and the Apocalypse, both Jewish and Christian (and towards the end, a bit of Islam), in the West for the past 2500 [...]...

Jacob Neusner: Teacher, Scholar, and Friend

Jacob Neusner, renewed scholar of the ancient Judaism, who so profoundly shaped the academic study of religions in terms of both method and content, died last October 8, 2016, on the Sabbath, at age 84. On the Jewish calendar that would be next Sabbath–called Shabbat Shuvah, which falls between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur–when the [...]...

Monday Missive – September 11, 2017

The English Department Has Received a Grant from the North Carolina Humanities Council — I am pleased to announce that the English Department has just been awarded one of the North Carolina’s Humanities Council’s “Large Grants” to support a series of community events around the theme of “The Child Character in Southern Literature and Film.” This $20,000 grant will make it possible for the English Department to bring several...

Monday Missive – September 4, 2017

 

Working and Making — When I think about the meaning of Labor Day, I think about the meaning of work in our daily lives.  One of the most memorable books I have ever read on the meaning of work is Studs Terkel’s Working:  People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do.  I read this collection of oral history interviews when it first came out in 1974.  I was an undergraduate student at the time, and I read it for one of my classes.

Many of...

Monday Missive – August 28, 2017

Laz Varnas and the Origins of Our Linguistics Program — If you have ever watched My Big Fat Greek Wedding, you’ll likely remember that the father in this film always traces the origins of practically everything back to the ancient Greeks.  He is very proud of his Greek heritage and takes every opportunity to share his passion for all things Greek.  In some ways, Laz Varnas, the first linguist in our English Department, reminds me of the father from this film....

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